Published January 31, 2013, 12:06 AM

Haugland shares elk hunt with his father

One of the oldest traditions between a father and son in the Midwest is the opportunity to hunt together.

By: Royal McGregor, The Dickinson Press

One of the oldest traditions between a father and son in the Midwest is the opportunity to hunt together.

Hunting between a father and son has no age barrier, whether they are 5 or 50.

Brent Haugland of Dickinson, 39, was able to share his once-in-a-lifetime elk license with his father, Marvin, who is a retired school teacher from South Heart.

“It’s how I grew up,” Brent said. “If it wasn’t for him, I probably wouldn’t have the love of the outdoors. You have to hand it to him for instilling it in me. It’s really enjoyable when you can do stuff like that with your dad.”

On Dec. 11, Brent filled his tag with a 5x5 elk south of Watford City. He said it was one hunting experience that he’ll always remember.

“It was probably the biggest hunting experience I’ve ever had,” said Haugland, who works at Berger Electric in Dickinson. “Out all the hunting I’ve done it’s probably the more exciting one I’ve ever had. When you get a once-in-a-lifetime tag like that and then you get to fill it, it’s quite enjoyable.”

Marvin said when Brent asked him to come along he did cherished the opportunity.

“It’s great to go up there with him,” Marvin said. “When he asked me to come with, I didn’t hesitate one bit. We made about four trips up there and saw elk everytime but one.”

An average bull weighs 700 pounds and stands 5 feet at the shoulder, while a full grown elk can weigh up to 1,200 pounds. The weight and length alone can be quite a load for two hunters. Brent said one of the landowners brought a pay loader and helped put it in that back of his pickup.

“I didn’t have to do too much,” Brent said with a laugh. “That made it a lot easier for me.”

Brent plans on getting the horns European mounted, which is a mounting style that includes the antlers and skull.

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