Published December 16, 2012, 05:05 AM

OUTDOOR NOTES: DNR plans hearings on species at risk

The Department of Natural Resources has scheduled a public hearing for 6 p.m. Feb. 5 at the Sanford Center in Bemidji to take input on a plan to update Minnesota’s list of endangered, threatened and special concern species... and more.

DNR plans hearings on species at risk

The Department of Natural Resources has scheduled a public hearing for 6 p.m. Feb. 5 at the Sanford Center in Bemidji to take input on a plan to update Minnesota’s list of endangered, threatened and special concern species.

The DNR is proposing to remove 15 plants and 14 animals, including the bald eagle, from the list while adding 114 plants and 67 animals, including the moose, to the list. State law requires the DNR to create and periodically update the list. It was last officially updated in 1996.

The Bemidji hearing is the only one planned for northwest Minnesota. Hearings also are set for Rochester, New Ulm, Duluth and Plymouth, Minn.

For more information on the proposed changes and how to comment, go to dnr.state.mn.us/ets/rulesrevision.html.

— Minnesota DNR

Hunter education classes

Now is the time to sign up for a hunter education class in North Dakota because most of the courses are offered early in the calendar year. State law requires anyone born after Dec. 31, 1961 to have passed a certified hunter education course to hunt in the state. Hunter education also is mandatory for youth hunters who are turning 12 years old; children can take the class at age 11.

To register for a class, go to gf.nd.gov, click the Online Services tab and “online course enrollment” under the Hunter Education heading. Classes are listed by city and also can be sorted by start date. To register for a class, click on “enroll” next to the specific class and follow the instructions. Personal information is required.

Anyone without Internet access can sign up for a class by calling (701) 328-6615.

— N.D. Game and Fish Department

Michigan moves toward wolf hunt

Michigan is moving closer to joining Wisconsin and Minnesota in offering a wolf season.

The Michigan House on Thursday approved a bill designating wolves as a game species by a vote of 66-43. The Senate approved the measure in November and will consider a minor House amendment before sending the bill to Gov. Rick Snyder for his signature.

Wolves were removed from the endangered list earlier this year after rebounding from near-extinction in the upper Great Lakes region. About 700 are believed to live in Michigan’s Upper Peninsula.

Supporters of the bill say it’s time to allow hunters and trappers to thin the population. They say wolves are killing livestock and venturing too close to towns. The Humane Society of the United States has said it may sue to restore federal protections.

— Associated Press

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