Published June 16, 2010, 12:42 PM

Game and Fish: Wear life jackets

Nancy Boldt, boat and water safety coordinator for the North Dakota Game and Fish Department, said the single most important part of safety on the water is wearing a personal flotation device. North Dakota law requires all children ages 10 and younger to wear a personal flotation device while in boats of less than 27 feet in length. The law also requires all personal watercraft users to wear a life jacket, Boldt said, as well as anyone towed on skis, tubes, boards or other similar devices.

Nancy Boldt, boat and water safety coordinator for the North Dakota Game and Fish Department, said the single most important part of safety on the water is wearing a personal flotation device.

North Dakota law requires all children ages 10 and younger to wear a personal flotation device while in boats of less than 27 feet in length. The law also requires all personal watercraft users to wear a life jacket, Boldt said, as well as anyone towed on skis, tubes, boards or other similar devices.

Failure to wear a PFD is the main reason people lose their lives in boating accidents. The National Safe Boating Council warns boaters that most drowning victims had a life jacket available, but were not wearing it when they entered the water.

“It is difficult to put a life jacket on once you are already in the water,” Boldt said.

Water users should make sure to wear life jackets that are the appropriate size and in good condition. It is also important that children wear a PFD while swimming.

When purchasing a PFD, Boldt suggests considering the most prevalent water activity. Water skiers and tubers should wear a life jacket with four nylon straps rather than one with a zipper, because straps are stronger than zippers upon impact with water. Anglers or people paddling a canoe should opt for a PFD that is comfortable enough to wear for an entire outing.

Water skiers and tubers are reminded it takes three to ski and tube. When a person is towed on water skis or a similar device, an observer other than the operator is required on the vessel.

It is important for swimmers to know the depth, as serious injuries can occur from diving into water, officials said.

“Know what is below the water’s surface, especially near shore,” Boldt said. “Larger objects can be hidden, potentially leading to a significant injury.”

Officials also said North Dakota boaters are reminded that marine VHF radios are an important part of boat safety that should not be improperly used by operators. Boldt said they are intended for boat operators who are in distress and facing an emergency situation.

Regulations to help ensure safe boating this summer can be found in the 2010-12 North Dakota Fishing Guide. A more comprehensive listing is available in the North Dakota Boat and Water Safety Guide or the Boat North Dakota education book. These guides are available online at the Game and Fish website, gf.nd.gov, by e-mail at ndgf@nd.gov, or at a local Game and Fish Department office.

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