Published September 17, 2009, 09:57 AM

The Trout Whisperer: A mammoth of a time in deer stand

When you’re sitting in your favorite deer stand this fall, if good fortune smiles on you a deer, bear, moose or wolf may walk by.

By: The Trout Whisperer, Lake County News Chronicle

When you’re sitting in your favorite deer stand this fall, if good fortune smiles on you a deer, bear, moose or wolf may walk by.

About nine thousand years ago, if you were sitting in your deer stand here in North America you may have had a Columbian mammoth walk by. You’d know it was a cousin to the wooly mammoth just by the tusks that ran up to twelve feet or longer in length. There weren’t too many Columbian mammoths left back in the day, so I’m sure there was a closed season at that time for hunting them. Oh, and If you still want to hunt mammoths in America try digging in the La Brea tar pits outside Los Angeles.

Mid- to late September the weather can go from short sleeves to a down jacket pretty quickly. A major factor in how we get our weather is referred to as “air masses.” We’re especially familiar with “polar air masses.” The gap between air masses are called “fronts.” Cold fronts typically move faster than warm fronts unless they plop on us and don’t move, in which case we call them “stationary fronts.” Air masses in the fall are on the move, just like the migrating birds, so have your clothes ready.

Did you ever want to know what birds live in your back yard? With the falling leaves, this season can be the time to look at empty nests now left exposed. With a camera you can take a quick snapshot and look them up online or at the local library for proper identification. Some nests may have residue left over from when the birds built them, including feathers, for even more precise results.

So what’s the difference between a weed and a plant? Plants you want, and weeds you don’t. So too it is with insects and pests. When the bee makes honey, it’s considered an insect, bit if you get stung, it suddenly becomes a pest.

So let’s say you’re not at your deer stand but your sitting in the living room next to the TV stand. This is the time of year to take a good look around at your indoors and seal any cracks or gaps in your home to ward off wooly mammoths, or their smaller descendants.

Mice, squirrels and many other toothed woodland creatures will start seeking warmer attics or crawl spaces now in earnest. An ounce of caulking here and there is worth a pound of nails any day.

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